8 Coffee Brewing Methods

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Eight coffee brewing methods
 
French Press
First designed in 1929, this simple, filter-free brewing method produces a rich, full-bodied brew in about four minutes. Use coarse grounds to prevent bitterness - this also keeps the grounds from slipping through the fine mesh of the plunger
 
Turkish Ibrik
Traditionally cooked on scorching hot sand in the Mediterranean, this coffee pot is now designed for the stovetop but still produces a dark, authentic brew full of strong flavor. A slow heating method is best; the coffee should foam rather than boil. When the coffee is ready, enjoy it black or add cream for extra richness.
 
Pour over mug (or drip brew)
Ideal for coffee at the office or on the go, this portable brewer sits over your mug with a paper filter allowing the coffee to slowly drip through, producing a clear brew with nuanced, well-rounded flavor.
 
Pour-Over Carafe
This simple method filters evenly for a subtle and well-rounded brew. Similar to the drip method, the coffee drips slowly through a filter as you add the hot water. But, the carafe can hold several cups of coffee, making-it ideal for camping trips and brunch with friends.
 
Moka Pot (or stovetop espresso maker)
This iconic stovetop pot was invented in Italy in the 1930s. It uses boiling water to create pressurized steam that pushes the coffee through a filter into the top compartment. The result is a dark and sweet, full-bodied brew.
 
Chemex
With its simple, elegant shape and patented brew process, the Chemex eliminates oils, sediment and bitterness, resulting, in a rich taste.
 
Aeropress
This portable coffee maker produces a full-bodied, smooth brew while allowing for lots of personalization. Change the steeping time, pressure, or water temperature, or try "inversion" by steeping with the AeroPress upside down, to yield varied results.
 
Toddy Coffeemaker
Though it takes 12 hours or more, this method makes a rich and smooth cold-brew coffee concentrate that contains about 67% less acid than coffee made with conventional hot brewing methods. Dilute the concentrate with water or milk, or simply serve it hot or over ice.
 
sources:
The Home Barista by Simone Egger and Ruby Ashby Orr
bluebottlecoffee.com/preparation-guides/aeropress | toddycafe.com | chemexcoffeemaker.com/brewology | chemexcoffeemaker.com | foodandwine.com