Make Your Own Embroidery Blanket

Miranda Anderson

The cooler weather means it’s time to pull out our cozy throw blankets for snuggling up at home. One fun way to personalize and add interest to a plain-colored throw blanket is to imagine it as a giant embroidery project. Using chunky wool yarn and a knitting-gauge needle, you can embroider a folk-inspired border around the edge.

Make Your Own Embroidery Blanket - Discover, A World Market Blog

Make Your Own Embroidery Blanket - Discover, A World Market Blog

The handmade details add so much personality and coziness to a space. Using your choice of colors and stitches, you can customize the design to fit your style. We keep a big basket of throw blankets in the TV room, and my kids end up using them every time we’re watching a show or reading together on the couch. I love the way they add color and texture to the room, even without being a major feature.

This is a super simple project, and would be fun to do with teenagers or even a school-aged kid as well as on your own. It also makes a perfect gift for the upcoming holiday season. You can give a personalized, handmade-feeling gift without knitting the whole blanket itself, which is perfect if you don’t knit, like me!

Make Your Own Embroidery Blanket - Discover, A World Market Blog

Shop this look:  Pink Chair / Sheepskin Rug / Glass Vase / Throw Blanket

Giant Embroidery Blanket DIY

What you’ll need:

 

Make Your Own Embroidery Blanket - Discover, A World Market Blog

 

Steps: 

  1. Decide which colors you want to use and in what order, then thread the needle with 1 yard of the first color.
  2. Use the masking tape to mark 3 inches from the edge of the blanket on all four sides, then another 3 inches in, then the final 3 inches in. These tape lines will serve as the guide for your stitching so you stay straight.
  3. Begin your first stitch. I used a basic running stitch which just weaves the yarn up an back through the blanket. Stop to tie a new piece of yarn on when you get to the end.
  4. When you come to the corner where you began, pull through a few inches of yarn and tie a square knot. Then leave the fringe hanging. You can add another piece of yarn to multiply the fringe edges and make a tassel.
  5. Thread the next color of yarn onto the needle. For my second stitch I created a chevron stitch. This stitch works from right to left, with the needle pointed to the right at all times. As you thread through the blanket, then pull to the left, the yarn creates a twist at the top and then the bottom, which makes the triangle chevron pattern.
  6. Stitch along the whole blanket edge and tie the ends in a knot and tassel when you return to the beginning.
  7. Begin your third border by changing yarn colors again. For my third line I created a simple split stitch. In this stitch the needle is threaded double, with both ends of the yarn tied into place. Then each time you come up from beneath the throw, you pierce between the 2 lengths of yarn, splitting them.
  8. When you finish the third border, go back and add fringe to each of the corners by threading about 7 inches of yarn on the needle through the corner, stopping half-way to clip the yarn from the needle, then tying the yarn into a knot. Cut the fringe to an even length on each corner.

Make Your Own Embroidery Blanket - Discover, A World Market Blog

Make Your Own Embroidery Blanket - Discover, A World Market Blog

Use your new throw to bring some color and handmade design into your room, and to have on hand to wrap up. I’m dreaming of lighting the fireplace, snuggling up in this spot with my new embroidered throw and a good book.

Because of the wool yarn, you’ll want to wash this blanket in cold water and hang dry.

Make Your Own Embroidery Blanket - Discover, A World Market Blog

Shop this look: wicker basket / yarn embroidered throw blanket / velvet throw pillows

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